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mari.harutunian

Can trash bins leach ammonia?

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I have tested my tap, RODI, fresh mixed salt, tank water, and now my mixed salt water for that has sat in my Rubbermaid for a few days for ammonia multiple times. The problem seems to be either the bin itself or something getting into it. Regardless, I’m getting rid of it. My question is: is this a known phenomena? 7218ff52e8f57350244345cb20fb8edb.jpg

 

 

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I haven't seen that happen, but I admit that I haven't actually looked for it.  I always have bio films (slimy tubing and surfaces) in my DI container, though, which shouldn't happen with no nutrients in 0TDS water, yet always happened so I might have had some in there too.  Wonder if the material that can is made from lets it out if it isn't NSF certified like the Brute cans are?  Just speculation.

 

I also wonder if it might be chloramine in the water which isn't effectively being removed by your RO/DI.  It's hard to remove, and I guess could break down over time to add some ammonia to the water that might not be detectable as ammonia on a test kit before it has broken down into components.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chloramine

 

What's the ammonia PPM of that test vial you're showing there?  

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I haven't seen that happen, but I admit that I haven't actually looked for it.  I always have bio films (slimy tubing and surfaces) in my DI container, though, which shouldn't happen with no nutrients in 0TDS water, yet always happened so I might have had some in there too.  Wonder if the material that can is made from lets it out if it isn't NSF certified like the Brute cans are?  Just speculation.
 
I also wonder if it might be chloramine in the water which isn't effectively being removed by your RO/DI.  It's hard to remove, and I guess could break down over time to add some ammonia to the water that might not be detectable as ammonia on a test kit before it has broken down into components.
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chloramine
 
What's the ammonia PPM of that test vial you're showing there?  


8+ ppm. I dont think API can read higher than 8.


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What are the levels leaving the tap


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Out of tap, out of RODI, and after mixing fresh, is zero ppm ammonia.


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Years ago, some aquarists reported high ammonia, phosphates and other stuff coming from Rubbermaid Roughneck trashcans made from recycled plastics. Historically, the gray-colored Brute cans have been safe.

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de6d4cffb197a00304a2d6d774620754.jpg
Brand new, washed and scrubbed with vinegar. It’s RODI water that sat in the bin for a few days and the test kit is an unexpired API Kit. I am just not sure what to do anymore. Does Hanna make ammonia checkers?


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Take some of the RODI to a LFS and have them confirm your findings? Maybe a member here that uses something other than API will test for you.

I'd test but I use API myself.

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Where do you keep the tub and is it covered?

 

I have mine next to my furnace and there was a yellow film on everything. My tests were all over the place until I figured that out and wiped my bins and buckets out. Now I keep everything covered.

 

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Have you checked the water quality report for your water company to see if they use chloramine? It would be a source of ammonia that maybe wouldn’t show up immediately on a test kit as mentioned by Alan. Standard RODI filters won’t remove chloramine. Have you put water in a clean glass container and performed the same testing after storage? Can you seal your container to eliminate airborne contamination? 

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4 hours ago, WheresTheReef said:

Have you put water in a clean glass container and performed the same testing after storage? 

 

That's a great idea.  Make a 5 gal bucket worth of saltwater and 5 gal for the Brute trash can.  Put them next to one another in the same room, and compare ammonia between the two.  If ammonia rises in the Brute and not the bucket, then the problem is with the Brute.

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The trashcan is in a dark spare closet, no mold i checked. There was no top for this can when i bought it so it was uncovered. The last one was covered but i doubt it was airtight(do I Saran Wrap it?). I’ll put some water in some closed mason jars with some plastic shavings in each and then one open top one with and without plastic.


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I'd also cover to ensure nothing is entering the brute. You may have addressed this but is there anything else in the brute? Pumps, PVC, Etc?...


-A-a-ron




No pumps. Just the brute. This one was uncovered for the last picture though. That’s 3 days of sitting.


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Through what mechanism is an open top trash can getting ammonia and how should i seal it airtight? It came with no top.


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I've not seen that with the Brute's, Mari, but I've also not used them for years now. First, I assume that you've tested your fresh RO/DI water, yes? Also, as a control, it may be worth putting an open-topped glass jar out near the Brute and testing it after it's been exposed to the air for three days just to make sure that it's not something in the air. Don't worry about the can being (airtight) sealed or not because that's not operationally reasonable. Instead, run an experimental control (the glass jar or bucket approach) and test/record a one or two times a day (at the same time(s) every day) over the course of several days. This may give you extra data that may prove useful.

 

(If, however, the can's in a place where a lot of dust or other organics can fall into it, then by all means put a lid on it.)

 

 

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