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WHO'S WHO of WAMAS

Welcome to the "Who's Who of WAMAS"! Each issue of WAMAS Waves introduces you to the more personal side of some of our members. Please help to keep this column alive by answering our call for submissions CLICK HERE.CHAD, Newsletter Committee Organizer

treesprite

treesprite

 

The Watched Pot (sometimes boils over) - Mark (armydoc)

My worst aquarium hobby purchase was an aquarium controller. Contrary to its promise, it made my tank more unreliable, less stable, and led to several near disasters.I started out in marine aquaria about a year and a half ago. I purchased a running 26 gallon FOWLR from craigslist. Nothing complicated; everything was HOB. It was easy to take care of. The previous owner gave me a test kit I used for pH and nitrate without any issues. I topped off the water the old fashioned way and ran my tests we

Chad

Chad

 

DIY Automatic Feeder for Aquacontroller

Eheim 3581 Automatic Feeder   DIY Automatic Feeder for Aquacontroller One of my goals in designing my aquarium was to make things as automated a possible so that I could spend less time working to maintain the tank, and more time enjoying it. I use an Aquacontroller to control the lighting, temperature, cooling, and alarms, but feeding still requires manual intervention. I enjoy feeding my fish whenever I can, and believe that fish benefit greatly from a diet that includes more than just fl

Jon Lazar

Jon Lazar

 

A Closer Look: Mysids

Mysid Shrimp - are they in your tank?Often confused with larval offspring of many popular ornamental shrimp, some of the more interesting creatures that populate marine aquariums are from the order Mysidacea, the mysid shrimp. Much like other beneficial microfauna in our aquariums, they seem to spring up out of nowhere and represent a valuable natural food source for fish and invertebrates in our systems as well as occupying the important niche of helping to keep our systems clean.Without ventur

davelin315

davelin315

 

Marine Aquarium Disasters and How to Prevent Them (Part 3) - Scott L. Moore

The Great Tank BurstPoorly constructed homemade tanks or tanks not placed on a level surface, when filled with water, will put undue stress on the joints and seals causing a burst. Also, the seals in some very old tanks can weaken. More than one aquarist has had to deal with a hundred gallons of salt water in their living room. Consider that one gallon of water weighs 8.5 pounds (2.2 liters weigh 1 kilogram).Prevention: Buy from quality tank manufacturers! There are too many cheaply made tanks o

Chad

Chad

 

Mixed Reef - Failure as a Design Consideration

We have all heard the stories. We at WAMAS Waves have told them in our last three issues of the Marine Disasters series. Tank catastrophes caused by a myriad of problems that led to the loss of thousands of dollars livestock, damage to equipment, damage to our homes, hits to our pride, and hasty exits from the hobby. It is a risk that we accept in order to have these serene creatures, vivid colors, and part of the ocean in our homes. Right? Wrong.Errors are a part of every human endeavor. We all

Chad

Chad

 

Reef Photography - Part 3

Leafy dragon seahorse from the Florida Aquarium, Tampa.So now you've finished snapping pics of all your favorite corals and fish, and you're ready to begin posting them to WAMAS. You've read through Part 1 on taking focused pictures, and Part 2 on composing an attractive photo, and you're ready to start uploading. Not so fast! If cameras worked as well as the human eye, your pictures would appear true to life in color, brightness, composition, and focus, and you'd have a bunch of wonderful me

Jon Lazar

Jon Lazar

 

Homemade Fish Food - Scott711

I have done a lot of reading on what food/ingredients are beneficial for both fish and coral. After gathering all of the information about quantity and quality of foods I came up with the following list of ingredients for my food:shrimpclamsscallopsoysterssquidmusselsmackerelaloe Verabloodwormsbrine shrimpbaby brinerotifers frozen/freeze driedPE mysis shrimpmysisprawn Roecyclopeezeoyster eggsspectrum small pelletsdecapsulated brine shrimpfreeze dried copepodsGolden Pearls 5-800 microns 6 differe

Chad

Chad

 

Marine Aquarium Disasters and How to Prevent Them (Part 2) - Scott L. Moore

THE ARTICLE: Major Pest InfestationsAsterina Starfish, Aiptasia, and FlatwormsMarine pests are numerous and some can cause a tank disaster. Coral eating nudibranches can wipe out corals very quickly.Mantis shrimp may eat small fish. Live rock often contains many interesting and beneficial hitchhikers but it can also import dangerous pests into a tank. The Asterina species with a bluish spot in the center will eat coralline algae. Acropora Red Bugs will kill expensive acropora corals. Flatworms a

Chad

Chad

 

The "Who's Who" of WAMAS

Welcome to the "Who's Who of WAMAS"! The purpose of this column is to promote the social aspect of WAMAS. In this issue we have the pleasure of highlighting the personal sides of two of our fantastic sponsors!

treesprite

treesprite

 

Mixed Reef - Expanding Your DIY Horizons

A picture of an Arduino (mega 2560) card. Reefers seem to be almost any age, come from diverse backgrounds, and you might find one in any given professional field. One thing that we all seem to have in common is occasionally finding ourselves in a position where the ideal solution we are looking for cannot be found on store shelves. Of course, there also seems to be a desire to "just tinker with it" that we also seem to share.About six months ago I was researching do-it-yourself LED options to s

Chad

Chad

 

Reef Photography - Part 2

Jellyfish picture taken with my circa 2002 Nikon 4500 camera at the Monterey Aquarium. Point and shoots can take great pictures if you do it right.   If we're going to approach reef photography as an easy recipe to follow, you have to be prepared to add more to the mixing bowl than just technical capability. A focused, properly exposed photo is important, and you can pick up some tips on snapping better photos here in the last edition of WAMAS Waves. But to get your pictures from a lukewarm, k

Jon Lazar

Jon Lazar

 

The Regal Angelfish - Dave Lin

The Regal AngelfishPygoplites diacanthusDistributionBlue Belly VariantIndo-Pacific OceanYellow/Orange Belly VariantRed Sea, Indian OceanOften called the "Holy Grail" of angelfish for the reef enthusiast, not many angels garner the same attention as the Regal Angelfish. Rarely does a fish that is not an aberrant or a hybrid merit the same attention this fish does naturally. This gem of the sea is rare enough to be prized among aquarists but common enough to also be within the budget of most enthu

Chad

Chad

 

Marine Aquarium Disasters and How to Prevent Them - Scott L. Moore

Tank disasters cause people to leave the marine aquarium hobby more than any other reason. All of the following, emotionally draining and expensive disasters have actually happened to aquarium tank owners. Some disasters destroyed not only the tanks but aquarist's homes as well. Read carefully and learn from someone else's mistake instead of your own.One disaster can wipe it all out. Read on.Moving Too Fast:Although in and of itself this may not cause a disaster, it is the root cause of many of

Chad

Chad

 

The Borneman Anemone

Some of the most interesting inhabitants in my tanks are my Borneman anemones (Phymanthus buitendijki). Unlike our favorite bubble-tips they are not frequently available, although I did get my first from a WAMAS vendor and a second from another member (thanks, Jan!).These anemones are known to be hardy and to tolerate a wide range of conditions. One of mine has attached itself to rockwork in the sand at the bottom of a 90 gallon tank that has both 150w metal halide and T5 lighting. Two more are

Hilary

Hilary

 

Mixed Reef - Sun Corals

Tubastrea sp. under actinic lighiting dining on cyclopezeThese beautiful species are arguably most recognized denizens of corals. Their bright colors adorn many coffee table reef and diving books. We, as keepers of the reef, cannot help but be awe inspired by them and think how great they would look in our own aquariums. Remarkably, these beautiful corals are not that difficult to keep and by providing them with a few key necessities, they will thrive and grow in your aquarium.Placement: The sin

Chad

Chad

 

Reaching Out - Kudos to WAMAS Members

WAMAS members after working hard to provide a local high school Oceanography class with a reefRecently, WAMAS member Dave Sun was asked to help save Joanna Kulczak's tanks, an avid aquarist who recently passed away. Arrangements were made for one of the tanks to be donated to a local school. On February 26, a team of WAMAS volunteers consisting of Dave Frederick, Brain Ward, Steve Repp, Hilary Foster, Chip Frederick and Dave Sun dismantled the tank and brought it to a staging area.Former Chantil

Chad

Chad

 

Reef Photography (part 1)

"Sorry for the bad pics-my fish wouldn't stand still for me.""These pics don't do my tank justice.""Corals look much better in person."How many times have we read posts like this while viewing a fellow reefer's attempts to faithfully capture a view of their favorite fish or coral? Why is it so difficult to take good reef pictures? It's not for lack of information. There's no shortage of reef photography articles available throughout the hobby, and a quick search on Advanced Aquarist or ReefKe

Jon Lazar

Jon Lazar

 

Saltwater Fish Keeping Was an Adventure - Paul Baldassano

Saltwater fish keeping in the seventies and eighties was an adventure. It all started in 1971 when Peter Wilkens published his book in Germany titled "Saltwater Aquarium for Tropical Marine Invertebrates" (unfortunately it was not translated to English until the mid 80s). Very few stores sold saltwater fish and if they did, it was just Blue Devils, Dominoes and Sergeant Majors. The places that did offer salt water had just one small tank of saltwater fish and a huge sign outside that read "We ha

Chad

Chad

 

Adam's Algae 1: Overview

Algae Overview and ClassificationThe term "algae" seems like a relatively scientific name for a group of organisms. However, nothing could be further from the truth. Algae are not plants at all. Most species of algae used to be part of kingdom Protista, which has since been broken up into separate kingdom. The word "algae" refers to a group of organisms that spans across different kingdoms and can range from being microscopic to being over 60 feet tall, such as kelp. Only a fraction of thes

WaterDog

WaterDog

 

A Closer Look: Amphipods

Probably the most common and most visible microfauna of the reef aquarium are the amphipods of the Gammarus genus. There are over 200 different types of Gammarus amphipods and, although I have never looked into which species are the most prevalent in our aquariums, I can certainly recognize one when I see it. The amphipod is one of three members of the group that most marine aquarists refer to as simply "pods", the other two being isopods and copepods. All three of these are crustaceans and a

davelin315

davelin315

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